contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

Owner, Sylvia Thayer

508-414-6711

sthayer1231@live.com

 

210 Worcester St. Suite I
North Grafton, MA 01536

508-414-6711

Blog

Summer Group Class @ Vivo Strings!

Brittany Stockwell

Open to any and all beginner students! You or your student do not need to be a private student at Vivo Strings to participate! Tell your friends and family!

For more information please contact Brittany at bstockwellmusic@gmail.com !

Sign Up for Summer Lessons & Camps Now!

Brittany Stockwell

We are still accepting new students at Vivo Strings! And summer is the perfect time to start private lessons! We still have spots open for our summer camps as well, so take a look at the flyers below and contact us with any questions! And feel free to pass around to your friends and colleagues! 

IMG_0162.PNG

Vivo Strings Launches Strings Program at Touchstone Community School

Brittany Stockwell

We are beyond ecstatic to announce that we are starting a strings enrichment program at Touchstone Community School in Grafton, Massachusetts! The afternoon enrichment programs at Touchstone run for two month stretches, and Vivo Strings will be joining the Touchstone family just in time for the last enrichment session of the school year! Over the course of April and May, students in the strings program will become familiar with their chosen instrument (violin, viola, or cello) and learn how to play "Can't Stop The Feeling" by Justin Timberlake! The program will conclude at the end of May with a concert during which students will perform the song together! Growing up in a small, private school strings program, which nurtured us and helped us develop into the musicians and educators we are today, we are well aware of how much of a blessing this opportunity is! We look forward to not only teaching our students at Touchstone how to play music, but also how music can change their lives! 

We are doing a presentation at a school this week and put together a paired down version of Can't Stop the Feeling by Justin Timberlake that students will be able to play. Subscribe for more videos! Check us out on Facebook @vivostrings Instagram @vivo_strings Snapchat @vivo_strings www.vivostrings.org

Shoulder Rest Review: KUN

Brittany Stockwell

We are really excited to have many different projects going on here at Vivo Strings! Our latest YouTube video project is a series of shoulder rest reviews! The video below is our first in the series, which is a review of the KUN shoulder rest. It is fair to argue that KUN may be the most well-known and popular shoulder rest brand for violins and violas, but is also not necessarily the proper shoulder rest for all players. One of our teachers, Brittany, used a KUN shoulder rest with her violin for over 15 years not realizing it wasn't the best fit for her. 

In this video we discuss the different aspects of a shoulder rest and how the KUN shoulder rests compare! After watching, make sure to subscribe to our channel so that you don't miss out on the other should rest reviews we will be uploading soon!

Summer Camps at Vivo Strings!

Brittany Stockwell


 

Vivo Strings

210 Worcester St. Suite I, North Grafton, MA 01536

W: www.vivostrings.org T: 508.414.6711


We will be offering several weeks of camps over the summer this year. There will be a different theme for each week of camp. Each camp will run from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm Monday-Friday with a performance at the end of each week on Friday at 1:00 pm. There will be an extended day offering for families who cannot pick students up at 12:00 pm or need to drop students off earlier than 9:00 am. Extended hours will run from 8:00 am to 9:00 am and 12:00 pm to 3:00 pm. During that time, students will participate in non-music related activities. (If you need care past 3:00 pm please inquire with teachers, this may be possible!)


Camp Rates

1 Week: $150

2 Weeks: $250

3 Weeks: $300

Extended Day: $10 per hour in addition to camp tuition

Summer Camp Weeks

July 17-21 Chamber Music

July 24-28 Summer Pops

July 31-August 4 Rockin’ Strings


Chamber Music Camp: July 17-21

Students will be placed in several leveled chamber groups for the week. The first block of each day will be spent in a large chamber group ensemble. The second block will be spent in their smaller (2- 4 students) leveled chamber group.

Summer Pops Camp: July 24-28

Students will be able to explore popular styles of music in an orchestra setting. The first block will be spent in a full orchestra rehearsal. The second block will include work in sectional groups according to each instrument.

Rockin’ Strings Camp: July 31-August 4

Students will get a chance to get “plugged in” with their instruments and play music they hear on the radio. During the first block we will explore music as a large group. In the second block, students will be split into “bands” that will practice music that they will perform at the end of the week.

Click this link to register now!

Flexibility: One of a Teacher's Greatest Tools

Sylvia DiCrescentis

We all have the philosophy at Vivo Strings that our job as teachers to keep students engaged by meeting them where they are currently. Ideally, we would love to work on really serious classical music in the order that we have found works the best with every single student. However, when you get down to teaching real students sometimes those methods do not engage every student. We firmly believe that taking these "detours" from our regular music to topics and styles that students want to explore makes us better teachers and students better musicians.

Often these detours end up solidifying an important concept more strongly into a student's musical vocabulary. For example, a student might discover that the pop music they want to play is more difficult than they realized and they desire to come back to more fundamentals so that they can play the pop music more successfully. Or a young student might need to move around rather than sit still at piano. I have been encountering this with a young piano student over the past several months. I got a large floor piano (Like the one in "Big"!) a few months ago for us to use in lessons. Today, we actually played all the way through two whole pieces (which is a huge accomplishment for this student!).

Kathryn, Brittany and I talk often about the desire make music fun for students but with the end goal being to teach every single one of our students mastery of their instrument. It is important for us to always have the end goal in the sight but at the same time have the flexibility to take detours along the way to keep students engaged.

Best,

S

Summer Lessons

Sylvia DiCrescentis

It is that time of year again to start thinking about summer lessons! We have opened up registration for summer lessons on the website so you can start thinking about what your schedule might be over the summer.

The summer session will start during the second full week of June and run through to the 3rd week of September. It is worth noting that the session runs almost a month outside of the regular "school" summer. We strongly encourage everyone to try to fit in some lessons over the summer. It makes a huge difference! The students that we see consistently over the summer generally progress faster and end up being more dedicated throughout the year. 
 
The schedule over the summer is always very flexible to accommodate vacations and summer camps. We only require notice a week ahead of time for any changes. We are offering several options for the number of lessons for the session. Students make take 13, 10, 8 or 5 lessons over the summer. 13 lessons would end up being nearly every week over the summer with a couple of weeks extra for flexibility. 5 lessons would end up being only a little over once per month. Any of these options can be spaced over the session in any way that you would like. I strongly recommend going up to a longer lesson if you know you can only fit a few in over the summer. Even if you will be out of town for a large portion of the summer, it is worth it to try to fit in lessons around when you will be away. 
 
Sylvia will be available Tuesdays, Wednesdays 8:00 am-7:00 pm and Thursdays 8:00 am-4:00 pm over the summer. Kathryn will be available on Fridays 8:00 am-11:00 am and Brittany will be available on Mondays and Tuesdays 8:00 am-7:00 pm. The weeks that school is still in session the schedule will be different, but those lessons will be scheduled on a weekly basis. 

If you already know what you schedule looks like you are welcome to register online (www.vivostrings.org) or through email. Be sure to select options labelled *Summer* online because the Spring items are still listed under registration for now. To register through email, please list the following information:

 
Student Name:
Parents/Guardians:
Phone #:
Email:
Address:
Instrument(s):
Schedule Preference (1st, 2nd and 3rd choices):
 
 
Any students who are thinking about auditioning for districts or youth orchestras in the future we would say it should almost be a requirement to continue lessons through the summer. Most of the audition lists are released before the end of the school year, so most students who are going to these auditions will be working on music all through the summer.
 
Certain hours (especially evenings) over the summer always fill up quickly! If you already know your schedule, we would recommend reserving a time as soon as you are able.
 
Please let us know if you have any questions at all!

Summer Camp Offerings at Vivo Strings

Sylvia DiCrescentis

 
 

We are excited to announce that we will be hosting several weeks of camps over the summer! There will be a different theme for each week of camp. 

Each camp will run from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm Monday-Friday with a performance at the end of each week on Friday at 1:00 pm.

There will be an extended day offering for families who cannot pick students up at 12:00 pm or need to drop students off earlier than 9:00 am. Extended hours will run from 8:00 am to 9:00 am and 12:00 pm to 3:00 pm. During that time, students will participate in non-music related activities.

Chamber Music Camp: July 17-21

Students will be placed in several leveled chamber groups for the week. The first block of each day will be spent in a large chamber group ensemble. The second block will be spent in their smaller (2-4 students) leveled chamber group.

Summer Pops Camp: July 24-28

Students will be able to explore popular styles of music in an orchestra setting. The first block will be spent in a full orchestra rehearsal. The second block will include work in sectional groups according to each instrument.

Rockin’ Strings Camp: July 31-August 4

Students will get a chance to get “plugged in” with their instruments and play music they hear on the radio. During the first block we will explore music as a large group. In the second block, students will be split into “bands” that will practice music that they will perform at the end of the week.

Register through this link for camps!

Rhythm Series: Level 3

Brittany Stockwell

This is the third video in a series of many music learning theory videos on rhythm that we will be posting on our YouTube page! Make sure you watch and practice with the videos in order!

Learn how to play rhythms on your instrument! In this video, we work on quarter note, half note, whole note and dotted rhythms. Find us on Facebook @vivostrings Instagram @vivo_strings Snapchat @vivo_strings www.vivostrings.org

 

Also, make sure to subscribe not only to our YouTube page, but to our Vivo Strings weekly newsletter as well by going to the bottom of our website and filling out the form! You will get updates on posts such as this as well as news and events!

Early Music Education: The Benefits of Starting Young

Brittany Stockwell

After years of studies and speculation, we can finally scientifically prove that music benefits brain development from a young age. From literacy development to improving math skills, music's overarching benefits for children is unquestionable. So why aren't we putting more emphasis on music education, especially from a young age? Yes, many schools both public and private offer music classes as part of their k-12 curriculum. But with many of these programs offering only general music classes due to curriculum restrictions and funding, it is important for parents to understand they have many other options when it comes to music lessons before their child ever steps foot into a classroom. And it's never too early to start. 

But when it comes to planning music education for their children, many parents may ask: where do we start? What is the appropriate and most beneficial age to start my child's music education and what exactly does that education look like? These dilemmas can be challenging for some parents, especially those who are not musicians themselves or those who are unfamiliar with what options are available to them. Let's start by answering a few of these questions and then go deeper into the holistic benefits of taking private music lessons at a young age:

Questions parents may ask:

  • How early is too early to start my child's music education?

  • What are the differences between music classes and music lessons?

  • What kinds of music classes/lessons are available to my child?

  • How do children benefit from early childhood education?


Because the truth is, most people are born with enough music aptitude to play in a symphony orchestra when they are adults, if they choose. But first we must learn how to “speak music”—to take the musical instrument we all have, ourselves, developing that musical capacity from a very young age.
— MusicTogether

How early is too early to start my child's music education?

When it comes to music, it is never too early to start exposing your children. From holding headphones on your pregnant belly to singing to your baby while they are still in the womb, believe it or not children's exposure to the benefits of music begin before they are even born. Before they can hear the music, they can feel the vibrations, and this is an amazing way to not only bond with your child before even holding them but also introduce them to the rhythmical world of music before they are born.

 

What kinds of music classes/lessons are available to me?

As soon as your baby is born, you have various different options for music classes. Most early childhood music classes are group classes that you are expected to participate in, which is a given considering you need to hold and help your baby interact with the music and activities! MusicTogether is an internationally recognized music program that offers these type of classes! They offer music classes for children starting from birth as well as classes for your toddlers. These classes consist of circle time focused on singing, the use of simple instruments such as drums and maracas, and of course dancing! I myself have been to several of these classes, for babies and toddlers, as a professional nanny. I definitely would recommend MusicTogether for parents as it is especially fun because you are experiencing it with your child.  Not only is your child benefitting from the music, they are benefitting while also bonding with you. Other suggestions for early music education classes include, Kindermusik, MusikGarten (Canada), and Kids' Music Round

At my music studio Vivo Strings in North Grafton, Massachusetts, we offer Beginner Suzuki Group Classes for violin specifically. Suzuki beginner classes consist of five students ages [      ]. The hope is that young students will become familiar with their instrument and have age-appropriate instruction in a group setting that will set them up for success in one-on-one private lessons, which is the ultimate goal once they complete the group class! In our Beginner Suzuki Group Classes, students learn how to hold and use their instrument with a foam violin. They learn how to sing some of the first songs they will learn to play on the violin, which includes Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. Parents learn right along with students, just like other beginner music classes of this age group, but parents will also learn how to use the violin! The beginner classes then transition into Twinkle classes with real violins! A music class such as this is considered a step above those that MusicTogether offer, because in this class we are focusing specifically on one instrument, the violin, and preparing students ultimately to either play violin, viola, or cello through private Suzuki lessons. Click here to read more about the Suzuki Method!


What are the differences between music classes and lessons?

Although I have suggested a few different companies for music classes, there are many different types of music classes out there for babies and toddlers if you search on Google. You especially may want to search for your specific area. As I mentioned before, these classes are group classes and include a teacher and many children with their adult guardians, but you may ask: when is the right age to start private music lessons? What are private music lessons? Private music lessons include choosing a particular focus, whether it be voice, piano, or violin. Believe it or not, the best age to start private music lessons is between 3-6 years old. We stress the importance of reading to our children and exposing them to books during their pre-school/early elementary years, so why not also stress the importance of exposing them to music as well? Studies show that learning to play a musical instrument helps children do better academically in the classroom, needless to say, starting private lessons before kindergarten like reading will help improve a child's development once they get to the classroom. 

Although you may say, I have no idea whether my child should play cello, or piano, or the tuba or whether or not they will even enjoy playing one specific instrument, do not fret. Oftentimes, children will decide after a year or two, or even more, that they would rather play a different instrument. The time spent in lessons and on practicing their original instrument is a major building block in their musical journey and education. In fact, it is not uncommon for musicians to play several different instruments. All that matters is that we start somewhere. There are many ways to find private music teachers. If you have not heard of a music program or school near you that offers lessons to students under certain ages, try Googling it! Music & Arts is a chain music store that along with renting or selling you an instrument also offers private music lessons. There are about 150 locations around the United States, many of which have in recent years taken over small business music stores. They offer private lessons for all different types of instruments. I would also recommend doing your research before you decide on where and with whom your child will take private lessons. This individual will become an important role model in your child's life if they continue to take lessons, which could be well into their teenage years! There are many small business music studios with teachers who specialize in specific instruments and particular methods of study, such as the Suzuki Method. I currently work in a small music studio, Vivo Strings, consisting of three teachers in North Grafton, Massachusetts.* I also travel to most of my students' homes and have used the website Thumbtack in the past to find students and have been very happy with the outcome! With the help of technology you are able to find programs as well as teachers that may even come to you and teach your child from the comfort of your own home! In 2017, you have many options for private lessons. To figure out what is best for you and your child you need to know exactly what you are looking for and what options work best with your schedule!

*Although we are discussing the differences between beginner music classes and private lessons, it is important to consider that your child may also benefit from particular group classes associated with their specific instrument alongside taking private lessons. If you decide to hire a private teacher to come to your home you may be foregoing the opportunity for your child to also benefit from group/ensemble classes unless that teacher has a studio nearby. At Vivo Strings, we offer group lessons ranging from beginners to advanced levels: Suzuki Beginner Classes, Chamber Ensembles, and Theory & Composition classes. Part of the Suzuki Method is taking same instrument group lessons alongside private lessons, as well as eventually also being a member of an ensemble and/or orchestra. For your child to develop into a well-rounded musician they must actively practice, take private lessons, and play alongside other musicians in groups and orchestra. This is something you definitely want to consider while researching private lessons after you agree and your child agrees to commit to one instrument exclusively, at least one instrument at first. 


Science has shown that when children learn to play music, their brains begin to hear and process sounds that they couldn’t otherwise hear. This helps them develop “neurophysiological distinction” between certain sounds that can aid in literacy, which can translate into improved academic results for kids.
— Melissa Locker, TIME Magazine

How do children benefit from early childhood education?

We've touched a bit on the benefits of early childhood music education but haven't really dived into the results of the research I mentioned. Lately I've been doing a lot of my own research on the benefits of music education. I personally began taking private violin lessons when I was 4 years old and continued to do so until I graduated from high school, 14 years later. And now as a music educator myself, I want to know exactly how and why music changed my life and how it will continue to shape the lives of my students as well. 

Research has proven that listening to music just isn't enough: "A new study from Northwestern University revealed that in order to fully reap the cognitive benefits of a music class, kids can't just sit there and let the sound of music wash over them. They have to be actively engaged in the music and participate in the class." To activate and strengthen neural processing, students must become active in their music education. This is why music classes and lessons are so important for brain development. Babies are able to shake a rattle and bang a drum, they are able to vocalize and sing a "song" before they can even speak. 

According to data collected by Wheaton College, researchers at the Boston Children’s Hospital worked with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and found early musical training enhances the areas of the brain responsible for executive functioning. And this leads to success academically as students seem retain information better and have more control over their behavior in the classroom. 

I find it difficult to even begin to discuss specifically how music changes lives, especially how it specifically alters the development of an individual (on many different levels) because it does so in so many different ways that you may not even consider at first. Grammy nominated music educator Anthony Mazzocchi encourages others especially parents to advocate for the musical arts because of the fact that studying music helps children develop, "creativity, responsibility, discipline, perseverance, composure, pride in results, collaboration, confidence, social and communications skills." He also points out what I believe is one of the major benefits of becoming a musician: emotional maturity. Something that even many adults lack. 


Our aim needs to be the nurturing of children. The moment we rigidly convince ourselves, “Education is what we’re after,” we warp a child’s development. First foster the heart, then help the child acquire ability. This is indeed nature’s proper way.
— Shinichi Suzuki, Nurtured By Love

Part of the reason the Suzuki Method has been so successful is not only because of its focus on perfecting the musical technique of the violin, viola, cello, and various other instruments, but because Shinichi Suzuki believed that the ultimate goal of a music educator should be to help a child develop and grow into a loving and compassionate human being. That is why, like I mentioned earlier, it is truly important you consider the major influence your child's music teacher will have on their life. They will be one of the most important adults in their life, especially if they continue to take lessons for years. I cannot thank my teachers enough for the time, patience, and love they invested in me as a musician and as a human being. I hope I am able to do the same for my students so they will grow and develop. Even if not every child who takes music lessons grows up to play in the Boston Symphony Orchestra, or to compose famous pieces of music, or to become a music educator themselves, the cognitive, academic, and humanistic benefits they have developed throughout their musical studies will forever impact what they do and who they are. 


Music enhances the education of our children by helping them to make connections and broadening the depth with which they think and feel. If we are to hope for a society of culturally literate people, music must be a vital part of our children’s education.
— Yo-Yo Ma

Rhythm Series: Level 2

Brittany Stockwell

February 24, 2017

This is the second in a series of many music learning theory videos on rhythm. Make sure you watch the first video before this one. Also make sure to subscribe by filling out the form on any page on our website to receive updates each time a new video is posted. 

We work on quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note and triplet rhythms in Level 2! Check out our social media and website: Instagram @vivo_strings Facebook @vivostrings Snapchat @vivo_strings www.vivostrings.org

Also, make sure to subscribe not only to our YouTube page, but to our Vivo Strings weekly newsletter as well by going to the bottom of our website and filling out the form! You will get updates on posts such as this as well as news and events!

Rhythms Series: Level 1

Brittany Stockwell

This is the first in a series of many music learning theory videos on rhythm. Make sure to subscribe for updates by filling out the form on any of the pages on our website to be notified each time we post a new video. 

Learn how to play rhythms on the violin! Subscribe for more rhythm tutorials! Follow us on Facebook @vivostrings, Instagram @vivo_strings and Snapchat @vivo_strings

Also, make sure to subscribe not only to our YouTube page, but to our Vivo Strings weekly newsletter as well by going to the bottom of our website and filling out the form! You will get updates on posts such as this as well as news and events!

Rhythm Series: How to Teach Rhythm in a Meaningful Way

Brittany Stockwell

There are many different ways music teachers all over the world teach their students how to read music, especially when it comes to understanding rhythms. Although there is not necessarily a wrong or right way to teach students how to read and understand rhythm, there are more productive ways to do so that help students comprehend how rhythms work. 

As part of a series on our Vivo Strings YouTube channel, Sylvia DiCrescentis has decided to give virtual lessons on how to teach rhythms using music learning theory. Not only will these videos be helpful to teachers they will also be extremely helpful to students because you can play along with the videos making them an essential practice tool for any beginner musician who struggles with rhythm. Each video will consist of a different level of music theory learning and feature either myself (Brittany) or Kathryn Haddad playing the rhythms and Sylvia verbalizing the different rhythmic patterns. To really benefit from these videos you must follow the strategies Sylvia uses in each series: verbalizing the rhythms as well as playing them on your instrument. 

If you are interested in getting notifications each time these videos are posted, make sure to subscribe using the form at the bottom of any page of our website! 

Musicians: Are we athletes?

Sylvia DiCrescentis

Almost two months ago, I was taking off a sweatshirt and felt a *POP* in my left shoulder and felt a good amount of pain. I thought “That was weird…” and went about my daily business. That weekend, my shoulder continued to hurt especially when I was playing my instrument. Two or three weeks later and I was still dealing with pain in my shoulder and decided I needed to see a doctor. A short visit to my orthopedic surgeon later and I had confirmed that I had damaged my rotator cuff. It could have been worse. I could have torn my rotator cuff, but it ended up being a strain not a tear. However, I am still dealing with the pain and lost endurance in my shoulder while playing violin and especially viola.

 
DSCN0703.JPG
 

    This journey over the past two months has brought me to the realization that playing an instrument (especially a stringed instrument!) needs to be approached with the same amount of training as an athlete would train to run a marathon. I have done extensive work over the years ensuring that my posture, balance, stretching, exercise (when I have the time!) and a whole host of other things are in place so that I do not injure myself. However, I have left out a crucial piece of the puzzle. I have not been strength training

 
 

    Over the past several years, I have been diving deeper into the cycling world (okay, maybe dipping my toe!). One thing that I have discovered in my training for long cycling events is that if I only train outside hitting hills as they come I have to train for much longer to reach a point where I can comfortably climb any hill and potentially injuring myself in the process. However, if I get on my bike in the house on my trainer and run 20 minute HIIT sets (High Intensity Interval Training), I can climb just about any hill that I encounter (slowly! but without feeling like I am going to die!). It is that targeted interval training that prepares my body to push through the obstacles as they arrive.

 

    I think many (maybe most?) musicians, including myself, approach performing like I used to train: encountering the physical nature of practice and performances as it comes, rather than targeted preparation for the physical task at hand. If we build up practice and performance time slowly, this might work and not cause injury or problems. However, at least in my experience, this is rarely the case. Often, I have huge bursts of performance and practice activity followed by lulls (because I am so exhausted). If we were consistently training our bodies for these activities, we might be more successful at them and prevent a whole host of injuries. I know from my cycling training, that it doesn’t even take a lot of time to prepare your body for climbing those hills.

It just takes focus.

 

    As I continue my journey of healing my body from this most recent injury, I will be posting more updates and tips to get your body into performance shape! Stay tuned for some of the targeted ways that I have found help me perform my best!

Best,

S

Meet Our Teachers

Brittany Stockwell

We are finally getting into a groove over at Vivo Strings! From YouTube tutorials to music teacher workshops, we have been keeping busy and not letting the blizzards slow us down! If you haven't viewed our first video up on YouTube, definitely make sure to do that and subscribe! Included in the video are interviews with each of our teachers, Sylvia, Kathryn, and Brittany, and brief glimpses into our daily life at the studio! 

 

Big Things Happening

Brittany Stockwell

Hello! And thank you for checking out our website and blog! We are super excited to share our weekly adventures at the studio with you via this blog! 

"Perhaps it is music that will save the world!" - Pablo Casals

If you haven't perused our website yet, make sure you take the time to do so! There are links with more information on us as individual teachers and what we are all about! In short, we hope to reach out to the Central Massachusetts community and help music touch as many lives, young and old, as possible! We hope to continue the tradition of music changing lives, which goes way beyond just becoming a musician! 

Sylvia (Thayer) DiCrescentis first started Vivo Strings music studio in 2013 to have a location to teach violin, viola, cello, and piano lessons. After four years, she has built a strong community of musicians who attend the studio weekly for private lessons. In 2016, Sylvia reunited with Kathryn (Skudera) Haddad and Brittany Stockwell during the Whitinsville Christian School Strings' 35th Anniversary celebration. Sylvia, Kathryn, and Brittany played together in the WCS Strings program for over ten years. During that time they participated in countless recitals, chamber and orchestra concerts, Massachusetts Central Districts and All-State Music Festivals, as well as going on several orchestra tours to the Dominican Republic and Louisiana. After reuniting, Sylvia asked Kathryn and Brittany to join Vivo Strings as violin and viola teachers. After months and months of planning and organizing, this week officially marked the start of the Vivo Strings studio family consisting of Sylvia, Kathryn, and Brittany as music teachers! But the hard work continues as we are building more classes and more opportunities for current students and future students at the studio!

Kathryn and Brittany are currently looking for new violin and viola students to fill their schedules at the studio! If you are interested in lessons, for either yourself or your child or both, please make sure to check out Kathryn and Brittany's teaching styles and backgrounds! These pages can be accessed via the home page of our website! Hover over +ABOUT on our Home Page and then click OUR TEACHERS and you will see links for each teacher. Please contact us for specific days and times for scheduling!

We are currently working on our YouTube website, which will include videos of all sorts. At the moment we are working on video interviews of each teacher for you to get to know us better, so please make sure to stay tuned and look for those on the site soon!

In the near future we will be uploading tutorial videos, with tips for practicing and reviews of products! 

As always, thank you for visiting our blog and make sure to stay tuned for future happenings at Vivo Strings!